Ennes Educational Foundation Trust Announces Scholarship Recipients

The Ennes Educational Foundation Trust has awarded four scholarships for 2016. Winners were chosen from applications received by July 1, 2017, from the previous 12 months.

The Harold E. Ennes Scholarship, Robert D. Greenberg Scholarship and John H. Battison Founder’s Scholarship are awarded to individuals interested in continuing or beginning their education in broadcast engineering and technology. The Youth Scholarship is specifically for a graduating high school senior interested in broadcast engineering as a career. Each scholarship awarded this year is for $1,500.

Clifford WhiteThis year the Harold E. Ennes Scholarship recipient is Clifford White of Tyler, TX. Cliff grew up near Tyler, TX, in a very technically inclined family. His father, Steve, has owned a small computer software company since the 1970s. Being around this technology, coupled with a unique curiosity, and nurtured a desire for all things technical. He discovered amateur radio at the age of 14, and within two months earned his Extra Class license. Being one of the few younger members of the local ham radio club, many of the older Elmers would give him old or broken equipment, which he would learn to fix. He learned most of knowledge of electronics from reverse engineering and repairing these old radios, oscilloscopes, spectrum analyzers, and similar other devices. Several of his ham radio acquaintances worked in the broadcast industry, and he soon began following them around learning about the big radios. He is currently a senior at LeTourneau University, where he is studying for an engineering degree. When not in school, he works as a consulting engineer for many radio stations in the East Texas area.

Thomas CarlisleReceiving the Robert Greenberg Scholarship is Thomas Carlisle of Mesa, AZ. Tom began his career in broadcast working as a freelance system design engineer focusing on recording studios, post-production facilities, and broadcast facilities in 2000 while based in New York City. In Dec 2004, Tom joined the staff of Trade the News. For the next eight years he helped design and expanded its web-based subscription Squawk Box service. In 2012, Tom joined Fox News as a broadcast maintenance assistant of the Quartermasters department. In 2014, Tom moved to Phoenix, AZ, to join the staff of NBC-affiliate KPNX as the staff broadcast maintenance engineer. In 2016, Tom jointed the staff at Sneaky Big Studios as studio engineer and currently manages all broadcast and technical operations. Tom received his CBTE in 2017, and is furthering his education at Mesa Community College to focus on preparation to take the test for his CBNE and CCNA (Cisco Certified Network Associate) in 2018 upon completion of the Cisco Networking Academy – CCNA program.

Timothy KyobeThe John H. Battison SBE Founder’s Scholarship has been awarded to Timothy Kyobe of Kampala, Uganda. Timothy started his professional journey as a radio broadcast and IT engineer seven years ago at the age of 25 at Capital Radio Limited, Kampala, Uganda, which is part of Radio Africa Group. That same year he completed his two-year university diploma in telecommunications engineering at the Uganda Institute of Information And Communications Technology. He is proud to be a Certified Broadcast Radio Engineer and Certified Broadcast Networking Engineer through the Society of Broadcast Engineers. He joined the SBE in 2015 when his employer sponsored him to attend the 139th AES convention in New York, where he met two SBE members whom he looks up to as role models. He had never known of any certified broadcast engineer in his country and is proud to be the first and only certified broadcast radio engineer and certified broadcast networking engineer in Uganda and East Africa.

Katy GerberKaty Gerber of Anaheim, CA, received the Youth Scholarship. As an incoming freshman attending California State University of Monterey Bay, Katy will study human communications and cinematic arts. With this education, she will enter the field of broadcast media to direct and inform an audience on ways to go about conscious living and consumerism. She currently works as a paid intern at Empire Media Productions where she provides media services to local government.

SBE President Jerry Massey, CPBE, 8-VSB, AMD, DRB, CBNT, said, “Education continues to be a focal point of the Society of Broadcast Engineers, and through the Ennes Educational Foundation Trust, we can assist deserving candidates with Ennes Scholarships to support their education in broadcast engineering.”

The Harold Ennes Scholarship Fund Trust was initiated by Indianapolis Chapter 25 in 1980 in memory of Harold E. Ennes, author of many textbooks for broadcast and broadcast-related communications training and a member of the Indianapolis chapter. Ennes was a member of the SBE’s national Certification Committee and made many contributions to the early development of the Certification Program. To encourage greater growth, the Scholarship Trust was transferred by Chapter 25 to the SBE national organization to administer in 1981. The name of the Trust was changed in 1995 to the Harold Ennes Educational Foundation Trust to fully embrace its expanded role.

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SBE Leadership Development Course Set for August

The Society of Broadcast Engineers will hold the 2017 SBE Leadership Development Course Aug. 8 – 10, 2017, in Atlanta, GA. This three-day course is an intensive study of successful leadership and management, designed specifically for broadcast engineers.

The course explores the nature of leadership, the difference between being a manager and being a leader, how to build a winning team, the importance of attitude in the leadership position, communication insights and so much more.

Rodney VandeveerInstructing the course for the seventh year will be Rodney Vandeveer, professor of Organizational Leadership and Supervision at Purdue University. Vandeveer brings more than 30 years of experience in human resources management, training, development and manufacturing. Vandeveer also owns a leadership training business, VanTech Training. A previous course attendee said, “Outstanding program! I found the material valuable, and Rodney [Vandeveer] is an engaging teacher!”

To register for this professional development opportunity, visit the Leadership Development Course page on the SBE website and click the Education tab. The enrollment fee is $620 for SBE members and $675 for non-members. The course will be held at the Hyatt Place Atlanta Airport South. A special room rate of $118 per night, plus tax, is available through July 10, 2017. Questions? Contact SBE Education Director Cathy Orosz at corosz@sbe.org.

The SBE has presented the SBE Leadership Development Course since 1997. The NAB sponsored the course from 1965 to 1995. This intense course is designed specifically for broadcast engineers who have or aspire to have management responsibilities. Details on the course are available at sbe.org/ldc.

SBE Launches Mentor Program

The Society of Broadcast Engineers, the association for broadcast and multimedia technology professionals, has begun its first Mentor Program. The Mentor Program is designed to provide broadcast engineers who are new to the field a means to gain insight and work with a seasoned broadcast engineer who can share his or her acquired knowledge. SBE Mentor ProgramThe SBE accepted applications for mentors and mentees from SBE members through September. Mentees were paired with mentors based on mutual experiences and career interests.

Participants are asked to have regular communication by voice or video at least every other week. In all but a few pairings, mentors and mentees are not in the same city, but this should not impair the interaction of the participants. Officially, the mentoring will last one year, but the professional relationship can certainly continue.

The inaugural launch of the program attracted 32 mentees and 18 mentors. Many mentors are working with more than one mentee. The SBE Mentor Committee is cochaired by SBE board members Jeff Keith, CPBE, and Eric Schecter, CBRE.

On the launch of the program, SBE President Jerry Massey, CPBE, 8-VSB, AMD, DRB, CBNT, said, “This program provides a fast-track for those SBE members who are new to broadcast engineering to gain practical insight and knowledge from some of our more experienced SBE members. Through this, we are able to tap the knowledge resource to grow an engineering talent resource. I extend a personal thanks to the volunteer mentors who are participating in the SBE Mentor Program.”

The SBE is still accepting applications for new mentors and mentees. As new mentors and mentees apply, new partners will be matched.

SBE Launches Chapter Training Video Series

The SBE has produced the first in a series of videos designed to inform and orient new and aspiring chapter chairmen and other officers and leaders about local chapter operations. The first video, titled Structure and Responsibilities, is available on the Chapters/Administration page of the SBE website. It is based on information contained in the SBE Chapter Manual.

Chapters can also use the video to help potential chapter leaders understand chapter responsibilities and how a chapter works. View the video in the chapter administration section of the SBE website or on the SBE YouTube channel.

SBE Plans Education Summit

What knowledge will the media engineer of the future need to master to meet the needs of his or her employer or clients? As new technologies continue to be developed and content delivery methods evolve, media engineers will need to keep pace to build and maintain the necessary systems these technologies require in the future. But just what technology will the media industry be using in 2021 or 2026?

The SBE will seek to acquire the necessary data to answer that question by hosting an Education Summit later this year. The summit will bring together a half-dozen media industry technology thought leaders for one day to discuss the technology in use today and the technology that they predict will be in use over the next five to ten years. The SBE will use the information gathered from the summit to develop a forward-looking document that outlines the competencies of future technical media professionals. From that, the SBE will develop educational content that prepares them to meet the industry’s needs.

Costs for the SBE Education Summit are being underwritten by the Ennes Educational Foundation Trust. Formed in 1980, the mission of the Ennes Trust is to provide and support educational opportunities for broadcast engineers through scholarships and educational programs, and provide support for education-related projects of the SBE. The Ennes Trust is supported through donations from members and chapters of the SBE and companies within the broadcast industry.

An SBE Education Summit planning group that includes SBE President Jerry Massey, Education Committee Chairman Wayne Pecena and Executive Director John Poray, are developing the details for the summit. They have identified five desired outcomes for the event that were approved by the SBE Board of Directors:
• What will the industry look like in 2019, 2021, 2026?
• What skills and knowledge will be needed for new technology?
• What skills and knowledge will be needed for legacy technology?
• Identify the cross-training needed for RF, IT and other personnel
• The unpredictable or unknown outcome generated from the group’s discussion

The planning group is inviting participants that represent a cross-section of today’s media technology community, bringing together some of our industry’s leading technology thought leaders. They are also determining the date and location of the summit.
Watch for updates about the SBE Education Summit in future issues of The Signal.

SBE Publishes Broadcast Engineering Handbook

The Society of Broadcast Engineers and McGraw-Hill Education have released the SBE Broadcast Engineering Handbook: Hands-on Guide to Station Design and Maintenance. This new book offers detailed practical information on video, audio and broadcast transmission systems from dozens of the field’s foremost experts. Featuring everythingfrom basic principles and formulae to the latest technologies and engineering trends, this hands-on resource offers practical and up-to-date coverage of all major broadcast technologies for radio, TV and related fields.

The SBE Broadcast Engineering Handbook features in-depth tutorials that stress key topics throughout, complete coverage of radio and television technologies, and is written from the perspective of the broadcast engineer. More than 50 authors have contributed their expertise to the ten sections of the book. These authors, recognized authorities in their fields, have volunteered their time to create this valuable resource. The handbook has been deftly assembled by Jerry Whitaker, CPBE, 8-VSB, editor-in-chief. He is vice president of standards development for the Advanced Television Systems Committee (ATSC) in Washington, DC, and also the author or editor of more than 40 technical books. Mr. Whitaker is a Fellow of the Society of Broadcast Engineers.

The book covers every aspect of broadcast engineering in seven sections: Regulatory Issues, RF Transmission, DTV Transport, Information Technology Systems, Production Systems, Facility Issues, Broadcast Management, plus three reference annexes.

The Society of Broadcast Engineers (SBE) is the only organization devoted to the advancement of all levels and types of broadcast engineering. With more than 5,100 members the SBE provides a forum for the exchange of ideas and the sharing of information to help members keep pace with a rapidly changing industry.

The book is available from the SBE Bookstore. SBE members can purchase the book at the member discount price of $159 through the SBE Bookstore. The book is also available through www.mhprofessional.com and online retailers for $199.

SBE Webinar: Broadcasters Sharing 2025-2110MHz With the DoD

This webinar aims to foster collaboration between the U.S. Department of Defense and the broadcast community in pursuit of establishing coordination procedures and operational harmony.

Topics:

  • Background on recent rulemakings affecting the regulatory status of the 2025-2110 MHz band and driving the DoD’s sharing with the broadcast community
  • DoD systems that will operate in the 2025-2110MHz band
  • Overview of coordination mechanisms and associated compatibility analysis and testing approaches
  • Framework for collaboration between the DoD, the SBE, and the NAB
  • Ongoing development of a coordination MOU
  • Need for development of database of broadcaster operations, equipment, and agreements
  • Q&A

 

Instructional MethodOnline

Date: Thursday, March 3, 2016 2-3:00 p.m. ET

Overview

SBE Recertification Credit

Registration and Pricing

Questions

Register Now

The SBE Ennes Workshop at the 2016 NAB Show

On Saturday, April 16 at 8 a.m. at the Las Vegas Convention Center in room S219, the SBE’s annual Ennes Workshop educational program at the NAB Show takes flight for the 21st time. Attendance requires a full NAB convention registration (available at a discount to SBE members) or either a PBS Techcon or NPR APRE registration and badge.

The Ennes Workshop at the NAB Show has always addressed what broadcast engineers most needed to know to be successful. The presenters are the best teachers, recruited specifically to address the topics at hand. The 2015 Workshop was so popular, an additional room was opened to handle the crowd overflow.

Following is a rundown of the day’s topics and presentations.

Morning

What you need for ATSC 3.0 – What’s different from 1.0
8:00 a.m. – 8:35 a.m.
Introducing the day’s program; a high level view of how an ATSC 3.0 TV station will be different from today’s ATSC 1.0 station and the fundamental architecture of the next generation in broadcasting.
Presenter: Rich Chernock; CSO; Triveni Digital

Immersive & Personalized Audio in ATSC 3.0
8:35 a.m. – 9:10 a.m.
An overview of Audio for ATSC 3.0, describing its immersive and personalizable elements.
Presenter: Skip Pizzi; Senior Director, New Media Technologies; NAB

SBE Executive Director’s Remarks
9:10 a.m. – 9:25 a.m.
Presenter: John Poray, CAE; Executive Director; Society of Broadcast Engineers

ATSC 3.0 PHY – Configurations/Coverage (Putting This Together)
9:25 a.m. – 9:50 a.m.
ATSC 3.0 PHY introduces many new technological features such as two-dimensional non-uniform constellations, improved and ultra-robust LDPCs, a novel frequency pre-distortion MISO antenna scheme and many others. It has extensible signaling to allow technology evolution within the physical layer in the future without breaking previous ATSC 3.0 PHY operation. Furthermore, it provides great flexibility in terms of configuration, and as a consequence the tradeoff of coverage area vs. configuration settings needs to be understood. Use cases of ATSC 3.0 will direct configuration settings to be set for certain expected channel conditions and various examples will show new coverage areas possible with the ATSC 3.0 PHY Layer.
Presenter: Luke Fay; Senior Staff SW Systems Engineer; Sony Electronics, Inc.

Demo: A Practical Complete TV Production System in a Carry-on Bag
9:50 a.m. – 10:10 a.m.
An amazingly complete video production system that not so long ago required a semi-tractor trailer is now a carry-on. We asked Paul, following an article inStreaming Magazine, to come to the NAB Show and demonstrate.
Presenter: Paul Schmutzler; Principal; Braintrust Digital

Signaling and Announcement Metadata – The next PSIP
10:10 a.m. – 10:45 a.m.
The ATSC 3.0 standard encompasses a large variety of broadcast technologies beyond the standard linear model provided by the original DTV standard: ATSC 1.0. While broadcasters will be able to deliver much higher quality linear digital television, the new standard also supports non-real-time (NRT) data delivery, an interactive runtime platform, companion screen support, automatic content recognition, personalization, and usage metrics. These new services are delivered using an underlying set of IP protocols over “pipes” within the broadcast frequencies or over broadband forming a hybrid delivery environment. The broadcast “pipes” (PLPs) can simultaneously deliver the broadcast content at different bit rates and robustness. All of this capability must be communicated to receivers in a way that allows efficient selection and decoding. The ATSC 3.0 delivery standard, A/331, includes signaling which prescribes a way to locate and tune to the services currently being broadcast and simultaneously provided over the Internet. The announcement standard, A/332, provides a mechanism to describe the upcoming programming event schedule. These standards encompass the core facilities for transmitting data and metadata that allow receivers to tune to the ATSC 3.0 services, including interactive applications and data, and provide a rich environment for discovery and promotion of upcoming programming. This talk will focus on the details of the signaling and announcement standards specifically the organization of the data structures, their interrelations and how they are expected to be used by receivers. The signaling and announcement data structures can be delivered simultaneously over broadband and broadcast so a description of how this is specified will also be covered. Implementation examples will be shown for how the signaling and announcement information could be used by an interactive receiver environment.
Presenter: Mark Corl; Sr. VP, Emergent Technology Development; Triveni Digital

Advanced Emergency Alerting in ATSC 3.0
10:45 a.m. – 11:15 a.m.
As the next generation of digital broadcast television known as ATSC 3.0 develops, one of the key features and application specified in the requirement for the system is Advanced Emergency Alerting (AEA). AEA will provide the public with alerting capabilities that are far beyond the EAS and WEA systems. AEA will not only support and deliver governmental provided alerts, it will allow stations to provide critical supporting information and even originate alerts when the station’s news and weather resources can provide critical and timely information on impending situations that could cost lives. This presentation will look at the system requirements along with the solutions and capabilities that are emerging in the ATSC 3.0 development process. Examples of the alerting content as displayed on receiving devices will be shown as well as a look at the information workflow that will take place within the system and television station.
Presenter: Jay Adrick; Technology Advisor and Consultant; GatesAir

Building Out an ATSC 3.0 SFN
11:15 a.m. – 11:45 a.m.
Presenter: Winston Caldwell; VP, Spectrum Engineering, Advanced Engineering; Fox Networks Group

Afternoon

SMPTE Century
1:00 p.m. – 1:20 p.m.
Presenters: Barbara Lange; Executive Director; SMPTE
Peter Symes; Director, Standards and Engineering; SMPTE

IP Content Delivery for IP Broadcasting – STLs for ATSC 3.0
1:55 p.m. – 2:25 p.m.
The ATSC 3.0 transmission system fundamentally is based on the use of Internet Protocol (IP) methods and data structures for delivery of content to consumer receivers. To facilitate that delivery, new infrastructure will be required to support aggregation of the data carrying the content and its transport to one or more transmitters. Most of the new infrastructure itself likely will be based on use of IP techniques. One significant portion of the new infrastructure will be the segment extending from the output of the Transport Layer to the input of the transmitter(s), encompassing formation of ATSC 3.0 Link-layer Protocol (ALP) packets and operation of the Studio-to-Transmitter Link (STL). In designing the new ATSC 3.0 STL system, it was necessary to make provision for Single-Frequency Network (SFN) operation of multiple transmitters and to document provisions for practical transmitter operations in both single-transmitter and SFN configurations. The new ATSC 3.0 IP STL sub-system will be described in its various aspects along with considerations for SFN operation.
Presenter: S. Merrill Weiss; President; Merrill Weiss Group LLC

The State of and the Pieces of UHDTV
2:25 p.m. – 2:55 p.m.
Believe it or not and as painful as the shift to HD appeared, it was a perfect storm where several technologies lined up for program suppliers, new distribution methods and consumers. This specifically being file based workflows, 16×9 aspect ratio, digital distribution, flat screen TVs and surround sound. By contrast, UHD’s improved resolution does not present the same kind of visual improvement for consumers with sub 55-inch screens at normal viewing distances. Consumers generally consider more pixels as an upsell feature only. The real UHD benefits of high dynamic range, wider color gamut and higher framerates allow the industry to break free of many of the legacy parameters designed initially for tube displays at the expense of compatibility. This makes UHD a real game changer that will likely be more disruptive than the switch to HD. This session will put all the UHDTV issues on the table to help inform your direction as ATSC 3.0 makes UHDTV a reality.
Presenter: Stan Moote; Advisory CTO; IABM

Cellphone 101 for Broadcasters
2:55 p.m. – 3:25 p.m.
A smart phone is a very capable RF platform that can be configured not only for data and phone calls, but in some cases FM radio and UHF television. Most of what a smart phone is, is software defined and limited by the hardware. There is also a carrier component. What your carrier will support and allow is a big part of what your cell phone can do. ATSC 3.0 supports mobile viewing either via the over-the-air transmission path or through a WiFi gateway. Knowing the basics of how your cell phone works will help you understand what is possible and practical.
Presenter: G. Kent Walker; Vice President of Technology; Qualcomm

Digitizing Terrestrial Radio
3:25 p.m. – 3:55 p.m.
There is much debate in the broadcast industry on the future of terrestrial radio transmission. AM service is widely recognized to be struggling and some countries are working on replacing FM with DAB transmission in band III. While HD Radio deployment combined with the FM service is gaining momentum there are no concrete plans for full digitization of the FM band. No matter the technology, while operating in an analog/digital simulcast environment the broadcaster bears the highest transmission cost. This session will show that only when the end goal of pure digital transmission is reached can we achieve lowest transmission costs and best spectral efficiency. Now imagine turning 30 analog FM stations to 300 digital HD Radio stations within the existing FM band. Extending the FM band to include TV channel 5 and 6 can provide yet another 200 audio services; plenty of capacity to revitalize the AM service with shared translators on a digital carrier. Today, many radio receivers can tune to the top end of TV channel 6 and many chipsets have support for the entire extended FM band. With digital HD Radio transmission it is also possible to provide ancillary audio service to a TV station with minimal impact to the ATSC signal. A single transmitter can broadcast 15 or more audio services along with data services; ideal for cultural and ethnically diverse content in urban markets or more audio services in rural markets. What about crowd sourcing 15 different music genres and making radio an interactive experience? With increased data capacity can we carry TV based immersive audio over to radio? Is it time to make surround sound work in cars? Artist experience and traffic services are already well established. Let’s build out graphical data services over HD Radio. What about graphical sport updates and adverts? What about advertising campaigns delivering coupons to listeners via QR codes captured on a smartphone? What about periodic traffic camera updates in your car? This session will paint a vision of a true multimedia radio experience that is only achievable once we embrace all digital terrestrial radio broadcasting. The best part is that this future is available now as we can demonstrate this system working with over 30 million HD Radio receivers in the field and shipping now in most automobile models.
Presenter: Philipp Schmid; Research Engineer; Nautel Limited

Where the Rubber meets the Cloud – Implementing Television in a Datacenter IP
3:55 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.
Television Networks from ABC to XYZ are experimenting (or more) with IT-based Channel Origination, including Live Integration, in all-IP datacenter environments. These environments include local and hosted “cloud” technologies and practices, a long way from green tweakers and black burst. This talk explores the early lessons and design approaches of several early adopters of these data-centric television technologies.
Presenter: John Mailhot; Manager; Imagine Communications

Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) for News Gathering
4:30 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.
Many broadcast and media organizations are pursuing commercial operation approval by the FAA of Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) for news gathering. Navigating the training, procedures and proper application with the FAA for waiver under Section 333 can be very involved. The disciplines are similar in scope to other regulations and safety procedures with TV helicopter operations; however, these aircraft are unmanned. This session will give an overview of how to get involved with an FAA Designated UAS Test Site, assigning a designated UAS Operations Manager, implementing a UAS flight program, training Pilots and Visual Observers. The current status of FAA requirements for UAS Pilot certification will be reviewed. “Safety First” is the goal and initiating flight procedures with your Risk Management teams is imperative.
Presenter: Doug Houston; Director of Engineering; WCPO-TV

Ennes Educational Foundation Trust Announces 2015 Scholarship Recipients

The Ennes Educational Foundation Trust has awarded four scholarships for 2015. Winners were chosen from applications received by July 1, 2015, from the previous 12 months.

The Harold E. Ennes Scholarship, Robert D. Greenberg Scholarship and John H. Battison Founder’s Scholarship are awarded to individuals interested in continuing or beginning their education in broadcast engineering and technology. The Youth Scholarship is specifically for a graduating high school senior interested in broadcast engineering as a career. Each scholarship awarded this year is for $1,500.

John PooleyThis year the Harold E. Ennes Scholarship recipient is John Pooley from Boston. Pooley is a student at Emerson College in Boston studying studio television production with a focus on broadcast engineering. He would like to work as a news photographer/editor/engineer and has experience in news, live event, and corporate video production. John is also an Eagle Scout, a Certified Archery Coach, and a shodan black belt.

Cliff WhiteReceiving the Robert Greenberg Scholarship is Clifford White from Tyler, TX. During the summer of 2015, White worked as a broadcast engineer at Radio Esperanza in the Rio Grande Valley of Texas. He now does freelance radio broadcast engineering work while studying electrical engineering at LeTourneau University in Longview, TX.

The John H. Battison Founder’s Scholarship has been awarded to Patrick Wright of Madison, WI. Wright is currently enrolled the Illinois Institute of Technology in Bronzeville, IL, and studying computer engineering. His broadcast engineering experience includes work for Newsweb Radio Corporation and WLS. He currently works part-time at WCPT-AM/FM.Patrick Wright

Elaine Phillips received the Youth Scholarship. She is a freshman at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. She previously attended Harvard Extension School. Legally blind, she aspires to use technology to enrich lives, especially for disabled people. She is interested in studying electrical engineering to make TV broadcasts more accessible to the blind.Elaine Phillips

SBE President Joe Snelson, CPBE, 8-VSB, said, “The Society of Broadcast Engineers, through the Ennes Educational Foundation Trust, is honored to reward these deserving candidates with the Ennes Scholarships to support their education in broadcast engineering.”

The Society of Broadcast Engineers is the professional organization of television and radio engineers and those in related fields. The SBE has more than 5,100 members in 114 chapters across the United States and in Hong Kong. There are also members in more than 30 other countries. Most chapters meet monthly and offer educational programs and an opportunity to network with other engineers. The SBE offers the largest and most recognized certification program for broadcast engineers, operators and technicians, with more than 4,500 certifications currently active.

The Harold Ennes Scholarship Fund Trust was initiated by Indianapolis Chapter 25 in 1980 in memory of Harold E. Ennes, author of many textbooks for broadcast and broadcast-related communications training and a member of the Indianapolis chapter. Ennes was a member of the SBE’s national Certification Committee and made many contributions to the early development of the Certification Program. To encourage greater growth, the Scholarship Trust was transferred by Chapter 25 to the SBE national organization to administer in 1981. The name of the Trust was changed in 1995 to the “Harold Ennes Educational Foundation Trust” to fully embrace its expanded role.

FEMA Plans New England Regional IPAWS Test, Holds Informative Webinars To Prep

FEMA, working with state broadcast associations in Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, and Vermont is planning to conduct a New England regional IPAWS test in September. This test will be a follow-up to the tests conducted in West Virginia last September, which resulted in 90% of participating stations successfully carrying the National Periodic Test EAS code and second test involving participants in Ohio, Kentucky, Michigan and Tennessee, conducted on March 18, 2015, which met with similar success. FEMA is conducting a series of regional tests in preparation for a future nationwide IPAWS test. The goal of these preliminary tests is to evaluate how messages are distributed and propagated throughout the system, and identify areas for improvement.

The next regional test, which will involve participants in Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, and Vermont, will be conducted on Sept. 16, 2015, at 2:20 p.m. Eastern Time. Local radio and television stations are not required to participate in the test; however, broad participation by stations will be very helpful in evaluating how the test messages propagate throughout the region.

In preparation for the test, FEMA is hosting technical webinars on Aug. 19 at 2 p.m. Eastern and Sept. 3 at 10 a.m. Eastern. The webinars will outline how the Sept. 16 test will be conducted, and will also provide information regarding EAS device configuration in preparation for the test. The technical webinars will discuss the technical side of IPAWS and conclude with step-by-step instructions for configuring various EAS devices. The two tech webinars will be essentially identical. The webinars will be recorded and available for later viewing as well.

The webinars are open to all but will specifically address the New England test. FEMA will conduct additional webinars in support of future tests in other areas of the country.

Links

Topic: NE ISSRT Technical Webinar I
Date and Time: August 19, 2015 2:00 p.m., Eastern Daylight Time (New York, GMT-04:00)

Event address for attendees:

http://tinyurl.com/nufuecl

Audio conference information
650-479-3207
Access code: 662 686 997

Topic: NE ISSRT Technical Webinar II
Date and Time: Thursday, September 3, 2015 10:00 am, Eastern Daylight Time (New York, GMT-04:00)

Event address for attendees:

http://tinyurl.com/nlrpfmc

Audio conference information
650-479-3207
Access code: 662 930 173